UA News

The Computer Sciences Category

The Computer Sciences category has been in The Undergraduate Awards since its inaugural year.

Students of all Computer Sciences disciplines, including Computer Systems, Coding Languages, Information Technology, Artificial Intelligence and more are eligible to submit works to the category.

Entries for the category must be within the 12,000-word limit and have received a 2.1/A grade.

Last year, the category was won by Tomas Higgins from the Dublin Institute of Technology. His paper, titled “Identifying Mood by Analysing Keystroke Dynamics”, highly impressed the Judging Panel, who commented:

This paper paves the way for novel societal contribution in the field of Computer Sciences by analysing how iT systems might be able to recognise human moods. It provides an excellent and accessible discourse on the author’s research motivation, hypothesis and evaluation. The judging panel chose this excellent paper, not simply for its own merit, but also because it demonstrates a method through which technology could be put to use to achieve individual and societal benefits.

You can read his paper in The Undergraduate Journal here.

We are very excited to receiving submissions for this year’s Computer Sciences category and reading innovative research from undergraduate students around the world.

If you are interested in submitting to the category, click here.

If you are interested in judging, click here.

The Visual Arts Category

One of the changes to the categories of The Undergraduate Awards in 2017 is the inclusion of a new Visual Arts category.

The Visual Arts category is designated specifically for the practical coursework component of art, craft and design students. Students of all areas of Art including photography, textiles, sculpture and more are eligible to submit to the category.

Unlike the rest of the paper-based categories in The Undergraduate Awards, the Visual Arts category requires students to submit images from their artist’s portfolio in .pdf or .jpeg format, with no more than 10 images are to be submitted, including one installation photo. Links to anonymous YouTube/Vimeo links may be included if appropriate.

Eligible submission is required to include an Artist Statement (max 500 words) along with the portfolio of your work. You can read our full submission guideline here.

Mohammed Sami Ali Amili from Ulster University was the Global Winner of the Visual Arts category in 2017 with his work titled ‘Paintings’, which was the result of his direct experience with the Iraq war. It was praised by the Judging Panel who commented:

The paintings deal with an aesthetic pravis that needs to avoid the aestheticisation of horror and are an actualisation of a cultural concern

Previous Highly Commended Entrants in the category included Maansi Jain from New York University, who currently works as an artist in Berlin and has published several works on Broadly and i-D Magazine; and Susanne Wawra from the National College of Art & Design, who was one of four artists featured in the Irish Times’ list of “50 people to watch in 2017“.

We are very excited to see all the submissions we receive into this new category!

If you are interested in submitting to the category, click here. If you are interested in judging, click here.

The Law Category

The Law category has been in The Undergraduate Awards since its inaugural year. Students of all areas of Law, including Environmental Law, Medical Law, and IT Law are eligible to submit works to the category.

Entries for this category must be within the 5,000-word limit and have received a 2.1/A grade.

Last year, the category was won by Jacqueline Williams from the Australian National University. Her paper, titled “The Enforcement Regime of the Australian Securities and Investment Commission (ASIC) under Chapter 7 of the Corporations Act: Reform Required”, was praised by the Judging Panel for its impressive use of comparative materials and good legal authority, demonstrating the author’s academic maturity. You can check out her work in the Undergraduate Journal here.

Previous Global Winners and Highly Commended Entrants includes Elena Butti from Ultrecht University and Donna-Marie McNamara from Dublin City University, both who have been involved in some inspiring work. You can read about what their projects on our Alumni Blog here.

We look forward to receiving submissions for this year’s Law Category and seeing works from amazing undergraduate students around the world.

If you are interested in submitting to the category, click here.

If you are interested in judging, click here.

The Music, Film & Theatre Category

Music, Film & Theatre is a new category introduced for the 2017 Programme of the Undergraduate Awards.

Previously, students of MusicDrama, and Film Studies could submit their works to the Media & The Arts category, which later became the Art History, Music, Film & Theatre category. In 2017, it was decided that  Music, Film & Theatre should constitute a category in its own right given its performance-base nature along with the quality and quantity of papers submitted.

The category is introduced to celebrate the work of students studying courses such as Musical Theory, Musicology, History of Music, Music Technology, Theatre, Dramatic Theory, Performance, Theatre History, Stage Management, Script Analysis, Film Studies, Cinema Studies, and more.

Entry for the category must be within the 5,000-word limit and have received a 2.1/A grade.

Last year, the Art History, Music, Film & Theatre category was won by Ming Wai Tai from the University of Hong Kong. Her paper, ‘From “Delightful” to “Barbarous”: The Decline in Canonic Writing and the Rise of Functional Harmony’, impressed the judges with its “admirable quality of rigour in its analysis” about an important moment in the development of European music.

Judges for the category will be experts in each field of study.

We are very excited to see the submissions we receive into this new category!

If you are interested in submitting to the category, click here.

If you are interested in judging, click here.

The NEW Architecture & Design Category

A jewellery design by Chloe Lewis from University of Dundee. Chloe was the Europe Regional Winner of Visual Arts and Design, 2016

The biggest change to the categories of The Undergraduate Awards in 2017 is the inclusion of the new Architecture & Design category.

Previously, students with work related to Design could submit to the Visual Arts & Design category (now Visual Arts) but there was little opportunity for students of Architecture to submit to The Undergraduate Awards.

We introduced this category to celebrate the work of students studying courses such as Architecture, Construction, Environmental Design, Interior Architecture, Landscape Architecture, Design, Product Design etc. Barry Sheehan from Dublin Institute of Technology, Chair of the Visual Arts & Design 2016 has commented that:

Architecture thrives on competitions, it is how most architects establish themselves in the profession. Winning is habit-forming and entering competitions as early as possible is essential.

Architecture & Design is a portfolio-based category. Entrants can submit up to 10 images and an accompanying statement of 1,500 words explaining their work.

Judges for the category include Mr Derek McGarry (National College of Art & Design), Dr Marc Ó’Riain (Cork Institute of Technology) and Prof Lloyd Scott (Dublin Institute of Technology).

We are so excited to see the submissions we receive into this brand new category!

If you are interested in submitting to the category, click here. If you are interested in judging, click here.

The Mathematics & Physics Category

Mathematics and Physics have been judged together as a single category at The Undergraduate Awards since 2012. Over the course of the past five years, we have received over 500 papers exploring all aspects of these disciplines, including astrophysics, geophysics and theoretical physics.

Entries for this category must be within the 5,000 word limit, and have received a 2.1/A grade.

 

In 2016 this category was won by Jamie Hargreaves from the University of Manchester. His paper, ‘The Role of Antisotropy in Nonlinear Elastic Models of Skin’ impressed the judging panel with its interdisciplinary approach, encompassing Biology, Mathematics, Physics and Computing. It was also praised for

“its focus on the application of fundamental basic sciences in everyday life experiences”.

 

Previous winning papers have modelled the reintegration of released prisoners (Shaza Alsibaai, King Abdulaziz University; 2016 Regional Winner) and explored the use of metal nanoparticles for surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (Cleo Harvey, Dublin City University; 2015 Global Winner).

 

We are looking forward to seeing the submissions to this year’s Mathematics & Physics Category and seeing the innovative research carried out by undergraduate students around the world.

 

If you would like to find out how to submit, click here.

 

If you would like to get involved as a judge for this or any other panel, click here.

Chair position extended to 4 years

The Undergraduate Awards accepts coursework into 25 umbrella categories which you can see here.

We then assemble academics from all over the world to assess these papers. These experts generously donate their time and expertise, because like us, they believe undergraduate academia should be celebrated and encouraged.

During the 2016 programme we hosted 323 academics from over 20 countries. Each category has a panel of judges, headed by a Judging Chairperson. The Judging Chairperson is responsible for coordinating the judging process within their category.

Most importantly to the process, all papers are anonymous, meaning they are judged purely on their academic strength.

The role of chairperson is vitally important and over the years we’ve been honoured to host outstanding academics as the chairperson of their category.

We are also humbled that so many academics choose to return to the judging process, summer after summer, with such enthusiasm. To take the example of just one past judge, Professor Joel Faflak from Western University, praised the opportunities presented by the judging process to engage with scholars and scholarship from around the world:

“Being a UA judge put me in touch with colleagues worldwide, that I never would have met otherwise, and in touch with an incredible pool of undergraduate talent.”

When UA started in 2008 we had a policy of allowing judging chairs to sit for just two years. As the process has grown and evolved over the years we review our policies with our academic advisory board.

We have now confirmed with our Academic Advisory Board that it would be beneficial to the programme to allow the position of chair to be held for a maximum of 4 years.

 

If you would like to find out more about judging at the UA, click here.

If you would like to be a judge for the 2017 programme please email bella@undergraduateawards.com

The Medical Sciences Category

We developed our Medical Sciences Category to incorporate other health disciplines, such as dentistry and veterinary science, alongside Medicine and Medical Science. It has proven to be a popular category, receiving well over a thousand research papers since 2012.

Entries for this category must be within the 12,000 word limit, and have received a 2.1/A grade.

 

In 2016 the Global Winner in this category Maniragav Manimaran from University College London. His paper, “Developing an Ultrasound Phantom Using 3D Printing for Practicing Minimally Invasive Intracardiac Procedures”, impressed the judging panel with its “novelty and flair”. It received particular praise for

“The ingenuity of the idea, the process that had been applied to realise that idea and then the efforts to validate it”.

 

Other successful papers in this category have confirmed the validity of MRI as a surveillance tool for renal disease (Conor MacDonald, St Andrews; 2015 Global Winner), and investigated oncolytic virotherapy treatments for ovarian cancer (Milani Sivapragasam, Western University; 2014 Global Winner).

 

We are looking forward to receiving submissions to this year’s Medical Sciences category and seeing the cutting-edge research that is being conducted around the world by undergraduate-level students.

 

If you would like to submit to this category, or any other, please click here.

If you would like to be a Judge for this category or any other please click here.

The Nursing, Midwifery & Allied Healthcare Category

The Nursing & Midwifery category has been with us since 2010, and has received nearly 650 entries since The Undergraduate Awards was launched globally in 2012. This year, however, we have broadened it to include the disciplines of Occupational Therapy, Physiotherapy, and other disciplines focussing on applied care.

 

Entries for this category must be within the 5,000 word limit, and have received a 2.1/A grade.

 

Last year, this category was won by Shauna Callaghan, a Midwifery student at University College Dublin, with her paper,

‘Does the Utilisation and Knowledge of Foetal Movement Counting Interventions and ‘Kick Charts’ Enhance Maternal Awareness of Foetal Movement Patterns and Reduce Stillbirths in Pregnancies ≥28 Weeks’ Gestation?’.

Shauna is beginning her clinical career as a Staff Midwife at the National Maternity Hospital, Dublin, and hopes to continue her research interest in antenatal education.

 

Other winning papers have examined the impact of information interventions on women’s choice of delivery methods (Marianne White, University of Dundee; 2015 Global Winner), and assessed the ethical, legal and political issues raised by abortion (Dawn Smyth, Waterford Institute of Technology; 2014 Global Winner).

We are looking forward to seeing the incoming submissions to the Nursing, Midwifery and Allied Healthcare category, and are particularly looking forward to seeing the new perspectives introduced by the inclusion of additional health care professions.

 

 

If you would like to submit to this category, or any other, please click here.

If you would like to be a Judge for this category or any other please click here.

 

 

 

 

The Classical Studies & Archaeology Category

Classical Studies & Archaeology covers a broad range of subjects – from the history, thought and culture of ancient societies, to the material culture of societies into the modern period. Entries for this category must be within the 5,000 word limit, and have received a 2.1/A grade.

Last year’s Global Winner, Alicia Núñez García from the University of Edinburgh, examined the enduring fascination of modern societies with the ancient past in her winning paper, “Modern Appropriation of Past Material Culture: Fostering ‘Soft’ Nationalisms in Mediterranean Europe Through Meaning, Memory, and Identity”.

This paper was praised by the judging panel for its originality, noting that

“The subtle way in which [Alicia] entangles the essay topic with current concerns about political processes in Europe and notions of archaeological activism, set this essay apart from other submissions”.

Alicia is now extending her research interests in outreach and public archaeology with an MA in Experimental Archaeology at the University of Exeter.

 

Other successful entries have studied the significance of the terebinth plant in Bronze Age society (Sharon Staub, University of Melbourne; 2016 Regional Winner: Oceania), and analysed the painting of Neo-Assyrian reliefs (Li Sou, Durham University; 2015 Global Winner).

 

We are really looking forward to reading the submissions to this year’s Classical Studies & Archaeology category, and seeing the amazing research being conducted in these fields by undergraduate students.

 

If you would like to find out how to submit click here.

If you would like to find out how to get involved as a member of one of our academic judging panels, you can find out more here.

Where Are They Now Wednesday: Trevor Clohessy presents NoiseyGen.XYZ – Entrepreneurial Ezine

Trevor Clohessy from NUI Galway was Highly Commended in 2013 in the Computer Sciences category for his paper:
Cloud Computing: A Catalyst for Innovation? A Review of the Literature

Dr. Clohessy is now a post-doctoral researcher and lecturer in Business Information Systems at his alma mater in NUI Galway. His research interests are digital transformation, cloud technologies, organizational ambidexterity, gamification and entrepreneurship. Trevor is on the judging panel of The Undergraduate Awards’ Computer Science category, an editorial advisory member of both the Irish Business Journal (IBJ) and IGI’s “Handbook of Research on Architectural Trends in Service-Driven Computing”, and a director with Youth Work Ireland. Trevor has also founded an award nominated entrepreneurial ezine resource called NoiseyGen.XYZ

NoiseyGen.XYZ: Entrepreneurial Ezine

The aim of the Ezine is to foster entrepreneurial spirit and promote awareness of how extraordinary people with extraordinary ideas are impacting on and shaping the future entrepreneurial landscape. NoiseyGen.XYZ was recently shortlisted for the best innovative blog of the year by the Littlewoods Ireland Blog Awards 2016. The Ezine serves as an online educational resource for students and the general public whereby monthly interviews and podcasts, from new and established entrepreneurs across diverse industries, provide insights into the salient characteristics which embody entrepreneurship spirit.

Make sure to check it out!

Trevor can be reached on trevor.clohessy@nuigalway.ie or  https://www.linkedin.com/in/trevorclohessy/

The NEW Art History & Theory Category

Art History & Theory is a new category, introduced for the 2017 Programme of The Undergraduate Awards.

Previously, students of Art History could submit their work to the Art History, Music, Film &  Theatre category. In 2017, it was decided that Art History & Theory should constitute a category in its own right, because of the number and quality of papers submitted on the subject. 

From medieval manuscripts to modern sculptures, this category covers all academic writing on the subject of Art.

 

 

One example of an Art History paper that was previously successful on the Programme is:

Empty Space and Identity Politics in the Work of Felix Gonzalez-Torres: Negation, Creative Reinterpretation, and Visual Rhyme

“Untitled” by Felix Gonzalez-Torres

This paper was submitted by Claire Dillon of Northwestern University and was the Global Winner of the Music, Film, Theatre & Art History category in 2015. Claire is currently studying for a M.Phil in Medieval Language, Literature and Culture at Trinity College Dublin. She will be progressing to pursue a PhD in Medieval Art at Columbia University.

Other Highly Commended entries in the subject of Art History have covered Michelangelo’s Battle of the Lapiths and Centaurs, biotechnology and contemporary art, civil war photography, gothic cathedrals and artistic depictions of the final frontier.

We are looking forward to seeing how this category flourishes in the years to come, and are particularly excited to see the incoming submissions to the 2017 Programme because of the top quality research being completed by undergraduate students in this field.

New categories often have less submissions than more established subjects, so if you know any Art History students (or are one!) remember to submit your best work!

If you would like to find out how to submit click here

 

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